Apocalypse
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Several conspiracy theorists and netizens have recently claimed that the world will end on June 21. Almost eight years back, doomsday mongers had argued the world will face an apocalypse in 2012, and they made these predictions based on the Mayan calendar. However, these apocalypse believers now claim that the Mayan calendar was misinterpreted, and the world end will actually happen today.

Is the World Ending Today?

Speculations regarding the end of the world on June 21 surfaced online after Paolo Tagaloguin, a mathematician, pointed out the errors in calculating the Mayan calendar.

"Following the Julian Calendar, we are technically in 2012. The number of days lost in a year due to the shift into Gregorian Calendar is 11 days. For 268 years using the Gregorian Calendar (1752-2020) times 11 days = 2,948 days. 2,948 days / 365 days (per year) = 8 years," explained mathematician Paolo Tagaloguin on his Twitter page last week.

As doomsday believers await apocalypse in the form of an asteroid or megaquake, astronomers have claimed that all these rumors regarding an impending world end are fake.

"Science is elegant and beautiful, but it requires an effort to understand. This is a golden opportunity to educate people. Any person with a scientific temperament, not necessarily a scientist, cannot support these types of messages," Hasan Al Hariri, CEO of the Dubai Astronomy Group told Gulf News.

Astronomer Phil Plait also dismissed the rumors surrounding this apocalypse prediction. According to Plait, the calculations made by Tagaloguin regarding the 11-day jump in the Georgian calendar are actually not true.

"The Gregorian calendar does not lose 11 days per year! Basically, the Julian calendar, which was widely used a long time ago, didn't account for leap years very well, so hundreds of years ago countries started switching to the Gregorian calendar, which does a better job (though it's a little complicated). When they did, the calendar had to jump forward a bunch of days to compensate for days missed— usually about 10 or 11 days — but it was only done once," Plait explained, Syfy reports.

Adamant Doomsday Mongers Await Apocalypse

Even though experts have dismissed the apocalypse predictions, conspiracy theorists and extreme religious believers argue that the world is currently going through the end times. According to some Christian believers, the recent events that happened in the world including coronavirus outbreak and locust attack are all fulfilling Biblical prophecies.

On the other hand, space apocalypse believers argue that the end of the world will happen as rogue planet Nibiru will hit Earth. However, NASA has assured that Nibiru does not exist, and it is nothing but an internet hoax.