Who Is Kim Kenely? FBI Interviews Former Cheerleader Who Was Idaho Murder Suspect Bryan Kohberger's Middle School Crush Who Rejected His Advances

She was then living in Sciota, a small town in eastern Pennsylvania, about 30 minutes' drive from Kohberger's house in Albrightsville and 90 miles north of Philadelphia.

FBI has interviewed a 27-year-old cheerleader, who reportedly was Bryan Kohberger's middle school crush, to understand the psyche of the man who slaughtered four Idaho college students to death. According to DailyMail.com, Kim Kenely, 27, contacted the FBI shortly after learning that her former classmate had been arrested for the gruesome murders.

Kenely's mother Sandra confirmed to DailyMail.com on Wednesday that her daughter told the FBI, "whatever she could tell them". Kohberger, 28, is accused of killing Maddie Mogen and Kaylee Goncalves, both 21, and students Ethan Chapin and his partner Xana Kernodle, both 21, in an off-campus house in Moscow, Idaho on November 13.

His Middle School Crush

Kim Kenely
Kim Kenely Facebook

According to the outlet, Kenely contacted the bureau on her own after learning that her friend had been arrested for stabbing to death the four Idaho students at a university just 15 minutes from where he was studying in November.

Kohberger, 28, who was at Pleasant Valley Intermediate School in Brodheadsville, Pennsylvania, developed a crush for Kenely and started dating her in sixth grade. Kenely later became a high school cheerleader.

Bryan Kohberger
Bryan Kohberger Twitter

"It was so long ago. I couldn't imagine what she had to tell the FBI. I guess it was for the character purpose," Kenely's mother Sandra told the outlet.

Her mother claims that Kohberger, who was back then an overweight, awkward misfit, would become obsessive in his pursuit of her, regularly leaving love letters in her locker and telling her he liked her.

"He would always say, 'Oh Kim, I think you're very pretty.' Just like weird comments. And she'd say, 'Oh my God, leave me alone.' She did not give him the time of day," Sandra said.

Kim Kenely
Kim Kenely Facebook

"When kids are little, they're mean. They don't say, 'Oh my god, thank you, but no.'"

Kohberger's heart would eventually be broken when Kenely told him to go. She was then living in Sciota, a small town in eastern Pennsylvania, about 30 minutes' drive from Kohberger's house in Albrightsville and 90 miles north of Philadelphia.

She now lives in Charlotte, North Carolina, and works as an occupational therapist at an assisted living community after leaving the locality.

Strange Mindset

In recent days, strange testimonies from former classmates and witnesses have emerged that depicts a picture of Kohberger as a troubled, angry young man who didn't fit in at school. Among them are Kenely's awkward playground interactions with Kohberger.

Dylan Mortensen
Dylan Mortensen, 21, (extreme left) and Bethany Funke, 21 (extreme right), the two survivors, with the four slain Idaho students Twitter

Kohberger is accused of murdering four people: childhood friends Maddie Mogen and Kaylee Goncalves, both 21, and students Ethan Chapin and his partner Xana Kernodle, both 21, in an off-campus house in Moscow, Idaho on November 13.

According to former classmates, Kohberger was overweight and the target of brutal teasing and bullying throughout middle school.

"The whole clique of popular girls made fun of him in school. They were the cheerleaders and the ones that every kid had crushes on," another classmate who wanted to remain anonymous told DailyMail.com.

"They literally tortured him, girls started making fun of him in middle school."

However, Kohberger appeared to change his ways in high school, where he started boxing and slimmed down. "He was a totally different person. He worked out constantly and was super aggressive," the male friend told the outlet.

Kaylee Goncalves and Madison Mogen
Kaylee Goncalves and Madison Mogen Twitter

"He had a short fuse and was constantly trying to change his style and personality to fit in with cliques."

Another of his classmates, who also didn't want to be identified, said, "It's interesting to me that the girls he's accused of killing were nice-looking and seemingly popular, much like the ones that made fun of him throughout his childhood."

His hypothesis supported that of former FBI agent Jennifer Coffindaffer, who had previously said that she suspected the killer might be an "incel"—a phrase for men who are unable to arouse a sexual interest in women.

It's probable that Kohberger's wrath and "personal, horrible desires" took control of him since he saw "all these beautiful girls go in and out" of the home, according to Coffindaffer.

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