Wednesday's attack on the U.S. Capitol by President Donald Trump's supporters resulted in five deaths, including a woman who died in a crowd stampeding that took place during the breach. Ironically, she was carrying a "Don't Tread on Me" a Revolutionary War-era flag.

The other casualties included two men and one woman, also Trump supporters, and one Capitol police officer. Air Force veteran Ashli Babbit was shot and killed by a police officer at the Capitol when she tried to enter the House chamber. The other rioters who lost their lives were later identified as Rosanne Boyland, Benjamin Phillips and Kevin Greeson, who accidentally tasered himself triggering a heart attack.

Rosanne Boyland
Rosanne Boyland Twitter

Boyland Crushed to Death by Falling Rioters

Boyland of Kennesaw, Georgia, had travelled to D.C. with a friend, Justin Winchell to attend President Donald Trump's "Save America" rally.

After Trump's speech, the two of them made their way to the Capitol to extend their support to the president's false claimsthat the presidential election was rigged and block Congress from affirming the outcome of the election in president-elect Joe Biden's favor. Boyland was trampled to death when a crowd of people attempted to breach security to enter the federal building.

"They basically created a panic, and the police, in turn, push back on them, so people started falling," Winchell explained before adding that people started falling over one another while tussling with police, pinning Boyland to the ground.

"I put my arm underneath her and was pulling her out and then another guy fell on top of her, and another guy was just walking [on top of her]," Winchell said. "There were people stacked two [to] three deep...people just crushed."

The Gadsden Flag
The Gadsden flag. Wikimedia Commons

What Does the 'Don't Tread on Me' Flag Mean?

The "Don't Tread on Me" flag, more formally known as the Gadsden flag, features a coiled rattlesnake and the above-mentioned slogan against a yellow background. It was originally a symbol of the American revolution, but has more recently been adopted by Tea Party supporters and Second Amendment advocates.

It has also been used by conservatives as a symbol for gun rights, American patriotism, individual liberties and disagreement with government intervention.