Loch Ness Monster
Representational Image Pixabay

Myths surrounding Loch Ness monsters have been perplexing conspiracy theorists for years, and now, a team of researchers has unearthed the remains of an ancient marine creature that resembles Loch Ness monster. The stunning discovery was made in Antarctica, and experts revealed that this creature might have roamed the Earth around the same time as dinosaurs, specifically during the Cretacious period millions of years ago.

Interestingly, it took many decades for researchers to uncover the remains of this gigantic creature. Experts believe that this aquatic reptile would have measured more than 40 feet in length, and it might have weighed an incredible 15 tons. It should be also noted that these remains on a small, desolate island off Antarctica are the first of its kind discovered from the southernmost part of Antarctica.

Even though researchers had discovered the remains of this mysterious creature long back in 1989, it took more than thirty years to unearth the aquatic reptile completely. Due to harsh weather conditions, researchers were able to conduct the expedition only in a few days in January and February, and in some years, they were unable to even visit the site.

Researchers revealed that this gigantic marine creature was part of the elasmosaurid family, and it had four flippers. The new discovery also suggests that there was a very vibrant marine ecosystem before the extinction of dinosaurs.

"For years it was a mystery ... we didn't know if they were elasmosaurs or not. They were some kind of weird plesiosaurs that nobody knew," said Jose O'Gorman, an Argentinian paleontologist, National Geographic reports.

A few days back, a couple named Gloria and Ian Davison captured the photo of a mysterious monstrous creature in the water while driving alongside Loch Ness in the Scottish Highlands. The photo captured by the couple soon went viral, and it made many people believe that the creature spotted is nothing other than the Loss Nech monster mentioned in Scottish folklore.