Men's Underwear Brand 'Moot' Gets Banned From Advertising on Television and Social Media

A men's underwear brand hailing from the United Kingdom called 'Moot' with the tagline Moot Revolution has got banned from advertising their products on television and social media. The founders are furious with the decision and have called the ban absurd and unjustified.

Moot Men's Underwear Banned From Advertising
Instagram grab / Moot Revolution

The brand was all set to air its first ever commercial on national television in a segment of the British breakfast show 'This Morning' on ITV, and minutes before the commercial was set to premier, the founders were informed by the channel that the commercial would not be aired at present and would be featured on a later date, but that simply never happened.

Co-founder of Moot, Jules Parker, revealed to The Guardian that he received a call from the lawyers of 'This Morning' informing him that the commercial ''wouldn't get past Ofcom,'' which is a television broadcast watchdog in Britain.

After ITV pulled their commercial from being aired, the founders were in a spot as Facebook blocked the brand's page from posting any ads related to its products. The move was followed up by Instagram soon. Both the social media giants cited Moot to be in violation of their policy on community guidelines.

Parker stated that Facebook and Instagram sent an email justifying their ban with the statement that read Moot uses ''adult content and include images focused on individual body parts.'' Parker said that several other posts on the Moot page were removed by the social media giants citing policy violations.

The co-founder revealed that if ITV had aired the commercial, the brand would have been in the spotlight and make life better as business would soar and their actions have dampened the brands spirits. He also hit out at Facebook and Instagram for coming after small businesses with censorship and that creates a significant impact on their revenue model.

''With no platform to pay for the small ads, and no budget for big marketing, we are invisible,'' he told The Guardian and pointed out the double standards Facebook and Instagram uses while allowing women's lingerie ads to flourish on social media while censoring men's underwear that showcases a different point of view.

A men's underwear brand hailing from the United Kingdom called 'Moot' with the tagline Moot Revolution has got banned from advertising their products on television and social media. The founders are furious with the decision and have called the ban absurd and unjustified.

Moot Men's Underwear Banned From Advertising
Instagram grab / Moot Revolution

The brand was all set to air its first ever commercial on national television in a segment of the British breakfast show 'This Morning' on ITV, and minutes before the commercial was set to premier, the founders were informed by the channel that the commercial would not be aired at present and would be featured on a later date, but that simply never happened.

Co-founder of Moot, Jules Parker, revealed to The Guardian that he received a call from the lawyers of 'This Morning' informing him that the commercial ''wouldn't get past Ofcom,'' which is a television broadcast watchdog in Britain.

After ITV pulled their commercial from being aired, the founders were in a spot as Facebook blocked the brand's page from posting any ads related to its products. The move was followed up by Instagram soon. Both the social media giants cited Moot to be in violation of their policy on community guidelines.

Parker stated that Facebook and Instagram sent an email justifying their ban with the statement that read Moot uses ''adult content and include images focused on individual body parts.'' Parker said that several other posts on the Moot page were removed by the social media giants citing policy violations.

The co-founder revealed that if ITV had aired the commercial, the brand would have been in the spotlight and make life better as business would soar and their actions have dampened the brands spirits. He also hit out at Facebook and Instagram for coming after small businesses with censorship and that creates a significant impact on their revenue model.

''With no platform to pay for the small ads, and no budget for big marketing, we are invisible,'' he told The Guardian and pointed out the double standards Facebook and Instagram uses while allowing women's lingerie ads to flourish on social media while censoring men's underwear that showcases a different point of view.