Democratic vice-presidential nominee Kamala Harris was a target of yet another false claim that said people spotted her in an intoxicated condition and that she vomited during a campaign stop in Cleveland, Ohio on Oct. 24.

Following her Cleveland stop, a photo of Harris went viral claiming that she found wandering "aimlessly" at Cleveland airport. In the photo, the California senator is seen hunched over with closed eyes and mouth opened.

"Throwing up in the bushes & staggering aimlessly at the #Cleveland airport was the last straw before staffers put #KamalaHarris back in the place and took off for #Oshkosh," a Facebook user wrote alongside Harris' photo. "Onlookers claim the clearly intoxicated Harris was confrontational but too weak to put up much of a fight."

However, there was no evidence that Harris was intoxicated. The photo was a screenshot from a clip she shared on Twitter last November when she visited Des Moines for a 5K race along with her brother-in-law. In the video, she is seen leaning over and wishing a child 'Happy Thanksgiving' as she handed out a cookie to him.

Kamala Harris
Kamala Harris, California senator and Democratic vice presidential nominee, speaks during a campaign event in Edinburg, Texas, on Oct. 30, 2020. Twitter/Kamala Harris

Additionally, Facebook also flagged the post for its dubious claim and fact-checking website PolitiFact rated the claim "Pants on Fire."

False Claims on Internet

Earlier this month, viral social media posts tried to paint Harris and Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden as anti-Christian. The posts cautioned Christian voters against voting for Biden-Harris because they held "views against churches/pastors."

"Biden's running mate Kamala Harris this morning said that, 'American churches are PROPAGANDA CENTERS for intolerant homophobic, xenophobic vitriol' and she called American pastors, 'knuckle-dragging disseminators of intolerance and enemies of social justice' Think about that," the post read, claiming that she did not hide her "disdain & contempt for the church.

However, the false statements that have been doing rounds on the internet since the start of October were found to be fake. A spokesperson for Harris' Senate office also dismissed the claims and said the quotes were falsely attributed to her.