Bright spots and illuminated arcs of solar material hovering in the sun's atmosphere highlight what's known as active regions on the sun, in this image from NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, captured on April 20, 2015. These are areas of intense and comp
Bright spots and illuminated arcs of solar material hovering in the sun's atmosphere highlight what's known as active regions on the sun, in this image from NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, captured on April 20, 2015. These are areas of intense and complex magnetic activity that can sometimes give rise to solar eruptions such as solar flares and coronal mass ejections. NASA/SDO

A couple of days ago, the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) space telescope captured an amazing clip that shows a comet nosediving into sun's core. It also captured several other celestial bodies including the Venus, who was located very close to sun. However, the remaining objects in the visibility are being blocked by an opaque disc to reduce the effects of glare.

The comet spotted in the video continued in its destined trajectory from the moment it was spotted as it headed directly into the sun. After entering the sun's atmosphere, the Kreutz sungrazer comet might be likely destroyed due to the star's scorching heat, but the visuals of its destruction are not visible in the footage.

According to experts, Kreutz sungrazer comets are an interesting group of comets that have been observed since the 1800s. These comets got this name as they were studied by Heinrich Kreutz in the 1880s and 1890s, and experts believe that these rogue space bodies are actually fragments of a giant ancient comet.

Scientists at space agencies like NASA and ESA are now planning to learn more about these Kreutz sungrazer comets, as they believe that understanding more about these space bodies could help to unveil more mysteries regarding the evolution of comets.

A few days back, Ethan Chappel, an amateur astronomer had captured the mindblowing video of a meteoroid crashing on the surface of Jupiter. Interestingly, the impact was captured using an ordinary telescope, and the visuals soon went viral on the internet. After analyzing the video, space experts revealed that the meteoroid that crashlanded on the surface of Jupiter was so big, and it was the reason why the bright light of the crash became visible on the earth.

Experts also revealed that the meteoroid impact happened on the southern equatorial belt of Jupiter, and the bright flash of light only lasted for some moments.