The archaeological findings always pave new ways for future research programs. This year, archaeologists discovered remains of several historic establishments and structures which are related to Christianity or Jesus.

Eighth-century watchtower

Church
Church Pixabay

Paratroopers with the Israel Defense Forces found evidence of a watchtower dating back to the eighth century BC in May. The tower measured 16 feet by 11.5 feet at its base, and its existing ruins stand 6.5 feet high. As per the archaeologist, it was likely a two-story tower when it was built and the pottery found at the site dates back to the reign of Hezekiah, who ruled Judah starting around 715 AD.

Temple Scroll

Archaeologists who discovered the Temple Scroll found the secret to the preservation of one of the most intact scrolls. As per the researchers, this scroll is imbued with salty minerals that don't come from the cave near the archaeological site of Qumran where the scroll was discovered.

But as per their study, the scroll may have been deliberately preserved by a method that's different from what was used on other contemporaneous scrolls. The custom brew of salts may have helped keep the scroll in a perfect condition for thousands of years.

Fifth-century burned church

Around 700CE the ancient holy land church near Sea of Galilee, in Israel was destroyed due to fire. But the beautiful mosaic floor of the church that included depictions of baskets, loaves and fish as well as inscriptions were discovered recently by a group of archaeologists.

It should be mentioned that as per the Gospel of John, the fourth of the canonical gospels, at the Sea of Galilee Jesus fed 5,000 people with five loaves and two fish and this event is also called as "Feeding the multitude."

Village links to Jesus' crucifixion

As per the Gospel of Luke in the New Testament, Jesus appears before two followers on the road to Emmaus, which is 60 stadia (10 to 12 kilometres) from Jerusalem. Just a few months ago a team of archaeologists reported that they may have discovered Emmaus. But the identification is still controversial.

Professor emeritus at the Institute of Archaeology of Tel Aviv University in Israel, Israel Finkelstein and a professor of biblical studies at Collège de France, Thomas Römer stated that archaeological site of Kiriath-Jearim, which sits the proper distance from the Old City of Jerusalem, is actually Emmaus.

Church of Apostles in Israel

A team of archaeologists from US and Israel have discovered the Church of the Apostles, believed to have been built over the house of Peter and Andrew, the disciples of Jesus, near Israel's Sea of Galilee. Even though the Church of the Apostles was mentioned in many Byzantine pilgrimage itineraries, many experts used to believe that these reports were not trustworthy.