Night falls over radio telescope dishes of the KAT-7 Array at the proposed South African site for the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) telescope near Carnavon in the country's remote Northern Cape province
Night falls over radio telescope dishes of the KAT-7 Array at the proposed South African site for the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) telescope near Carnavon in the country's remote Northern Cape province Mike Hutchings/ Reuters

There is no doubt that alien signals have captured humanity's attention for over a decade. Scientists examined eight repetitive extra-terrestrial radio signals, commonly known as fast radio bursts (FRB) from deep space. As per the researchers, these signals were detected by radio telescope of Canada.

As reported, these alien signals, detected by the Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME) radio telescope now bring the total number of known repeating FRBs to 10.

It should be noted that CHIME is specialized to monitor a very wide band of the sky in a lower frequency range than radio telescopes such as ASKAP or the Parkes Observatory in Australia.

Earlier this year, in January only one such mysterious signal, FRB 121102 appeared repeatedly and in the same month, again scientists noted the second repetition of the signal FRB 180814.

The astronomers have also noted eight new repeaters from known galaxies while determining their rough location by the way the signal is dispersed. It should be known that the radio signals are transmitted serially and the longest pause between them accounted for over 20 hours.

As per the researchers, they found that not all FRBs come from extreme gravity environments and this finding showed that there could be several different classes of objects or events that create FRBs. However, repeat bursts get weaker and less frequent in what the researchers call the 'sad trombone' effect.

Even though receiving such radio signals was detected earlier, no one expected that these repeated and frequent deep space signals will appear just a few months before alleged Area 51 invasion.

It is still not clear what these bursts are or what causes them, but experts suggest that FRBs may be the death rattles of neutron stars or young magnetars, extremely dense star cores spinning in a magnetic field.