Stephen Colbert and Jacinda Ardern
Youtube grab / The Late Show with Stephen Colbert

Comedian Stephen Colbert is the 'newest' person to visit New Zealand and as cool as it might sound, he hitched a ride with the Prime Minister of the country, Jacinda Ardern, in what was a super fun episode peppered with lots of laughter. Stephen was seen comparing the United States to New Zealand almost every minute of the show, saying that New Zealand really has a lot to offer in terms of work, security and plush greenery which looks eye spectacular.

Trump's US

As usual, Colbert started out dishing Donald Trump and told Jacinda Ardern, "The fate of our nation hangs in the balance. That's why all week we will have complete coverage of my amazing trip to New Zealand." He quipped it's the farthest he can go to stay away from the dumpster fire, which is American politics and joked that he's surviving happily in New Zealand ''without getting pecked to death by penguins".

Apart from his usual hit pieces on Donald Trump, Stephen Colbert talked about the "incredible people" of New Zealand and was flabbergasted looking at the "breath-taking" scenic views the country has to offer. He also openly admitted to being a big fan of Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern. The PM returned the favour by picking Colbert up from Auckland Airport and driving him to her house for an interview.

No snakes in New Zealand

Colbert also stressed on the fact multiple times that he's super impressed with New Zealand as the country has no snakes at all. For the uninitiated, there are really no snakes in New Zealand! The country is one among the rare islands without snakes. It is, however, home to several species of lizard! It's neighbouring country Australia, which has the deadliest snakes in the world. New Zealand is surely lucky!

Also, during a lunch interview, Colbert and Ardern spoke about gun laws and the tragic Christchurch mosque shootings, which killed more than 50 innocent people. The interview got emotional and showcased that it's easy to pass a gun law in New Zealand and a hurdle to pass it in the United States.