Black Holes in Milky Way
Black Holes in Milky Way NASA/Chandra X-Ray Observatory

It was legendary scientist Isaac Newton who initially proposed the idea that ocean tides are usually formed due to the gravitational force exerted by the sun and the moon on Earth's water bodies. In his law of universal gravitation, Newton stated that gravitational attraction between two space bodies is directly proportional to their masses, and will be inversely proportional to the square of the distance between the bodies.

Fundamental Paradigm Shift

And now, centuries after Newton proposed this theory, a scientist has claimed that the legendary physicist's theory is out of date. These claims are made by Alan Lowey, a former Royal Aircraft Establishment scientist, and he even put forward his own new theory called 'Fundamental Paradigm Shift'.

"I have proposed an alternative to Newton's idea of the theory of the ocean tides. He formulated his theory of gravity circa 300 years ago and reportedly had reservations about the ocean tides and how that actually worked with his mathematical theory and the French mathematician, [Pierre-Simon] Laplace helped him out by coming up with his own mathematics. But in retrospect, it still doesn't resolve the issues, if you think about it carefully enough," Lowey told Express.co.uk.

New Theory Using Black Hole Concept

According to Lowey, new research conducted on the existence of black holes and dark matter clearly indicate that several theories and hypothesis put forward by legendary scientists like Newton and Albert Einstein may be partially or completely wrong.

Citing a recent study conducted by Professor Andrea Ghez, a UCLA professor, Lowey claimed that there are stars moving around black holes at the center of the Milky Way. Lowey suggested that the dark matter at the center of the moon could be the reason behind the creation of ocean tides on the earth.

"I propose that dark/different matter at the Moon's center pulls on the Earth's core to create the ocean tides. The oceans are pushed from beneath due to earth-tides," added Lowey.