As the number of coronavirus cases continues to rise in UK, patients with a reasonable chance of survival are being put on ventilator. According to a report, this is not because of a lack of capacity.

The coronavirus death toll has continued to rise in the UK and several other European countries. Some countries have adopted measures to prioritise cases during this pandemic situation. Previous studies have analysed pandemic ventilator rationing and how it would help in understanding the better patient care.

As the doctors understand the more critical nature of the disease, they are also understanding the patients who need critical care. Around 20,000 NHS staff have come back to work during the pandemic in the UK.

Coronavirus
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Shortage of pulmonary ventilators during a pandemic

Studies prove that during a severe influenza pandemic there are likely chances that there will be a shortage of patient pulmonary ventilators. The Imperial College Healthcare NHS told the Daily Mail that the machines used to make the patients' breathe are being limited not because of a lack of capacity,

The trust told the daily that the "very poorly patients with coronavirus may need to be on a ventilator for extended periods", adding that "for some patients, this would not be in their best interests".

The trust is increasing their capacity to hold more patients as they learn more about the disease. According to the NHS, hundreds of critical care beds are available in London alone while the rest of the country has thousands. The staff aren't considering ventilating according to capacity considerations. The UK has now seen a drastic increase in the number of cases over the weekend. The majority of the cases are from England.

Former NHS staff come back to work

Prime Minister Boris Johnson posted a video from his self-isolation in which he said former NHS staff have returned to work. Around 20,000 NHS workers have returned to hospitals during the outbreak in the UK. Johnson said the country would get through the crisis together.

The UK death toll has crossed 1,200. The deputy chief medical officer said it would take around six months before everything would return to normal.