life after death
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A testimonial shared by a woman named Holly on the Near Death Experience Research Foundation (NDERF) website revealed that during the near-death experience, she felt a sense of relief. She also added that she lacked fear and experienced a speed-up of her thoughts during the strange event.

The experience of a lifetime

"I slipped in and out of consciousness and was no longer in pain. In fact, I felt a sense of relief. I was pulled from my body, not swiftly, but rather slowly and entered what can best be described as cold, heavy darkness. The darkness felt like a pervading weight holding me there and I wondered if this was where I was meant to stay and began to feel restless, as though I didn't intend to linger, this was not where I belonged," wrote Holly on the website.

As per Holly, the visuals she saw during the near-death experience were something indescribable. Holly remembered seeing green grass and blue sky enveloped with pleasant brightness. She added that it felt like, "Pure love, contentment and complete acceptance. This was home, I wanted to stay. I was at peace. But for whatever reason, I was sent back, it was not my time."

Near Death Experience: The reality

Even though people who have experienced NDE consider afterlife a reality, medical science proves it otherwise. As per neuroscience, a near-death experience is basically a subjective phenomenon resulting from disturbed bodily multisensory integration that usually occurs during life-threatening events.

During the time of NDE, oxygen levels in the blood will be reduced drastically causing hypoxia or anoxia, and it usually results in hallucinations among the victims. As the brain struggles to get sufficient oxygen, it performs a survival technique, which in turn gives the victims a feeling of calmness.

A study, conducted at Imperial College London (ICL), claimed that such experience occurred in up to 18 per cent of cardiac arrest victims who survived to describe them. Experts stated that brain the experience and feelings are actually be rooted in activity associated with psychedelics and the study is the first to show that the potent psychedelic, N, N-Dimethyltriptamine, which is known as DMT, can elicit experiences rooted in physical brain processes that strongly overlap with those described as the near-death feeling.