As the coronavirus or COVID-19 continues to spread worldwide researchers are getting to know more about the deadly disease. While most of the patients witness a short fight with the disease, others are left with constant side effects for months, which is a condition known as 'long COVID'.

Now, researchers from the King's College London have stated that women are more likely to witness long coronavirus than men. Dr. Claire Steves who worked in the research said, "We've seen from the early data coming out that men were at much more risk of very severe disease and sadly of dying from Covid, it appears that women are more at risk of long Covid," as reported by BBC.

'Long COVID' in Women

Coronavirus
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The other factors that appear to increase the risk of 'long COVID' include being over 50 years of age, having asthma, and also excessive fat. Those who witnessed more than just a cough when they got coronavirus are at high risk of 'long COVID'."Having more than five different symptoms in the first week was one of the key risk factors," the doctor added.

The discoveries from the COVIDSpymptom Study app that is currently getting used by more than 4.3 million Brits. In the research, the researchers used the data from the app to find the patterns, which are linked to 'long COVID'. The lead investigator of the app Tim Spector said, "Using clinical data from the over four million people who downloaded the COVID Symptom Study app run by ZOE and KCL, we have a unique insight into the long-term problems suffered by COVID-19 patients who didn't go to the hospital."

He added that the data shows that more than one in 10 still have problems a month on and almost one in 50 are still suffering even after three months. 'Long COVID' sufferers withness a broad range of symptoms that include up to 20 different problems and not the basic symptoms used for diagnosis. The deadly virus outbreak has created a major stir around the world in recent times infecting more than 40.7 million people worldwide and claimed the lives of over 1.1 million people globally in more than 170 countries.