Britain’s Prince Harry and his wife Meghan wave as they ride a horse-drawn carriage after their wedding ceremony at St George’s Chapel in Windsor Castle in Windsor,
Britain’s Prince Harry and his wife Meghan wave as they ride a horse-drawn carriage after their wedding ceremony at St George’s Chapel in Windsor Castle in Windsor. Reuters

Meghan Markle and Prince Harry have set up shop at Frogmore Cottage, away from the Royal Palace in a bid for privacy and to raise baby Archie in peace. But it looks like the couple Sussex may be taking things a little too far.

Reportedly, Meghan and Harry's new neighbours were issued with 'do's and don'ts' should they see the pair around the newly-renovated Frogmore Cottage. The issue was apparently raised at a residents' meeting for those living near the couple's home on the Windsor estate by a 'well-intentioned' member of estate staff.

The couple Sussex is world famous and they have a reasonable expectation of privacy. But like Wimbledon, trying to curb what members of a community can or cannot do in regards to a neighbor seems unreasonable. Reportedly, Neighbours were ordered not to strike up a conversation with the pair or ask to see baby Archie. They were also told to refrain from offering to babysit - or even stroke their dogs should they bound over.

If this is the kind of life Meghan and Harry desire, they should opt for an island in the middle of nowhere, so that no one will bother them. From the looks of it, if these demands are met, the next thing would be to avert your gaze when the Royal Family walks by. It sounds pretty dictatorial if you ask us.

Reportedly, one local remarked to The Sun: 'It would be funny if it wasn't so over the top.'

Another neighbour commented: 'It's extraordinary. We've never heard anything like it. Everyone who lives on the estate works for the royals and knows how to behave respectfully.....We aren't told how to behave around the Queen like this. She's very happy for people to greet her.'

Meghan Markle and Prince Harry need to realize that they need to try and connect with the British public, not alienate them.