Apple has unveiled the next macOS called High Sierra. Expected to be rolled out on Macs before Spring 2018, the desktop operating system of the company comes mostly with a host of tweaks and new supports. From file system to virtual reality, here are four features that are getting an upgrade.

More efficient Apple File System

The Apple File System (APS) is not entirely new as it has appeared on macOS and other Apple devices since the WWDC 2016. With High Sierra, Mac users will get to experience a few tweaks under the hood for APS. As it becomes the new default file system in Macs, Apple optimises APS through an advanced 64-bit architecture so it trims down the time it takes to respond when performing some tasks.

Even on older Macs, it now takes an incredibly quick moment to copy, paste, move, and send files. In terms of security, Apple brings built-in encryption, streamlined data backup, and crash proof ability.

VR support

With the revamped Metal 2 graphics technology, Macs can support external GPUs through the Thunderbolt 3 port. This means virtual reality development will be feasible; it even allows Mac users to connect VR headsets. Game publisher Valve confirmed on Tuesday that SteamVR is now available for Mac in beta. This also supports the HTC Vive and Unreal Engine. Apple is also offering game developers an external graphics dev kit containing a Thunderbolt 3 port and AMD Radeon RX 580 GPU so to get them started.

Safari's autoplay video blocker

Safari is dubbed anew by the company as the world's fastest desktop browser, thanks to its JavaScript performance that is way faster than Google Chrome. Two new and helpful features come with High Sierra: a blocker for autoplay videos and a new system of intelligent tracking. The latter uses machine learning to identify and remove advertising trackers to stop it from rendering more ads when users search for a particular keyword.

4K support

macOS High Sierra provides a new perspective in visual experience with the support to 4K resolution and upgrade to H.265. The latter renders smoother streaming and less storage space. Film professionals can take advantage of this in the Pro Tools.