A recent tweet by Amazon Mexico's ex-CEO's daughter talking about her late mother being a victim of domestic violence has gained the public's attention. In a heart-wrenching tweet, the victim's daughter posted horrifying pictures that were taken earlier this year. She said that her father had attacked her mother with a baseball bat while she was sleeping.

The shocking images show the victim Abril Pérez Sagaón covered in blood and her face swollen from the attack. After the incident, Perez had said that the only reason she had survived was that her son had found the husband holding a knife against her throat. Perez went on to file a divorce against her husband and placed a restraining order as well.

Man jailed for hurting wife
(Representational picture) Pixabay

"Imagine waking up in the early morning by the screams of your mother screaming for her life," tweeted Ana Cecilia, the victim's daughter. "Imagine getting up to see the beautiful face of your bloody mother thanks to the criminal you once called 'dad'."

It's common in Mexico?

Cecilia also tweeted that these pictures had hurt her emotionally, and she was hesitant to publish them because nobody would want to see it. She continued to say in her tweets that this was an injustice faced by many women across Mexico. The tweet follows after Perez's death which happened last week.

Perez had been in Mexico City for a court hearing on November 25 when a motorcyclist shot at her neck and her heart. She died in hospital later that night. No arrests have been made in the case.

Garcia left Amazon in 2017

The ex-CEO, Juan Carlos Garcia, was taken into custody for the assault and released last month as the judge downgraded the charges to domestic violence. According to a report by El Pais, Perez's relatives believe that Garcia was the one who hired the hitman to kill his estranged wife.

In a survey conducted by the National Institute of Statistics and Geography, Mexico, it was found that around 43 percent of women over the age of 15 who were in a relationship were subjected to some sort of violence in Mexico. Garcia left his position as the CEO of Amazon Mexico in 2017.