Major advertisers including Coca Cola, Pepsi, Starbucks and Unilever are among more than 90 companies that have suspended Facebook ads. The companies made the move saying the social media giant failed in combating hate speech and misinformation. Microsoft had also recently joined the ad boycott.

Following this, Facebook said on Tuesday that it officially categorized all accounts related to the far-right Boogaloo movement as a "Dangerous Organization Or Individual" as per its policies. Facebook will ban all content associated with this network.

This comes after rights groups such as NAACP and the Anti-Defamation League launched the campaign "#StopHateForProfit" mid-June.

Facebook logo
Facebook Reuters

FB Bans Many Pages, Groups and Accounts

The company already removed many such accounts -- 220 from Facebook and 95 from Instagram including 28 Pages and 106 groups as a subset of the broader Boogaloo movement as it based itself on violence.

Facebook also banned 400 more groups and over 100 other Pages hosting content that's similar to the violent far-right network run by accounts outside of it.

'Dangerous'

The category "Dangerous Organization Or Individual" also includes those praising and supporting such violent ideologies. The Boogaloo movement's supporters call for violent uprisings against the government with the aim to start a second American Civil War. The movement, mainly active online and loosely connected in offline groups, upholds ownership of guns.

Protesters burning US flag
Protesters burn the US flag in the capitol on Tuesday, when they threatened to pull down the Lincoln Emancipation Memorial Reuters

These groups are associated with the violence after the death of George Floyd. It is reported that the murderer of law enforcement officers in California is said also associated with the movement.

A Facebook spokesperson told Forbes that all Boogaloo content will not be banned, but only their posts, groups and accounts spreading content related to the violent network will be targeted.

The company's blog post said that the far-right movement had its presence in many locations across the US, as they engage with one another on Facebook, "actively promoting violence against civilians, law enforcement and government officials and institutions."

Facebook previously didn't take action on Trump's tweets such as his warnings to shoot protesters.