FAA Boeing 737 Max probe: Former manager links faulty sensors to two fatal crashes

Former manager Ed Pierson draws links between aircraft's faulty Angle of Attack sensors and the two fatal crashes that led to the death of 346 people.

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The US Federal Aviation Administration on Wednesday said that it has started an investigation related to Boeing's production issues, which were raised by a former manager of the company. The former Boeing manager warned that worker fatigue and schedule pressure raised safety risk and undermined quality.

The former manager said that the issues exist in the factory where the company produces its prized 737 Max. The new revelations by the former manager only add to Boeing's growing problems, as the company finds it increasingly difficult to come out of the crisis.

Boeing's crisis deepens as the company continues to incur losses. The company last week said that a significant delay in the return of its highest-selling 737 Max aircraft could compel it to temporarily halt production

Ex-manager points finger at Boeing

Boeing 737
A Boeing 737 Norwegian Pixabay/Tommy Olsson

Ed Pierson, a former manager at Boeing's 737 Max, has reportedly drawn a link between the aircraft's faulty Angle of Attack sensors and the two crashes involving the aircraft earlier this year. Pierson, according to Reuters, described the faulty Angle of Attack sensors as "chaotic and alarming state" and raised questions on the safety aspects at Boeing's factory.

Pearson, who appeared before US lawmakers on Wednesday for a hearing, said: "It is alarming that these sensors failed on multiple flights mere months after the airplanes were manufactured in a factory experiencing frequent wiring problems and functional test issues." This definitely opens a new angle of investigation for the Federal Aviation Administration.

Review of 737 Max to get delayed further

Boeing 737-MAX. (File Photo: Boeing)
Boeing 737-MAX. (File Photo: Boeing) IANS

There seems to be no relief for Boeing since. During the hearing, the Federal Aviation Administration said that it will now give Boeing any approval to fly 737 Max until the end of 2019. The agency cited reasons that a slew of steps in the review process still remain incomplete.

Many US lawmakers are of the opinion that the approval might get delayed till January and even go till February. Boeing's 737 Max remain grounded since March following two fatal accidents in Indonesia and Euthiopia that killed 346 people. Pearson during the hearing has now straightway put the blame on the faulty Angle of Attack sensors for the two crashes.

Boeing's crisis deepens as the company continues to incur losses. The company last week said that a significant delay in the return of its highest-selling 737 Max aircraft could compel it to temporarily halt production.

Even when FAA gives approval to the grounded 737 Max, it will still take Boeing another 30 days to resume flights.

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