A group of UFO (Unidentified Flying Object) chasers from Wichita, Kansas could possibly have been responsible for the mysterious drone sightings that have been reported across Colorado, Kansas and Nebraska that led many to believe that they were alien spacecraft.

UFO chasers responsible for mystery drone sightings?

The Journal-Advocate cited a man named Michael Spicer from Durango, Colorado, saying that a group by the name of ArchAngleRECON has been chasing UFOs and may have been responsible for some of the mysterious drone sightings. According to Spicer, his group was trying to track what they're calling an unknown "Tic Tac" aircraft, which has earned the name because of its oblong shape, as well as another strange aircraft flying underneath it.

UFO
Representational Image Pixabay

He also noted that while he couldn't confirm that all the reports of mysterious night-time drone sightings could be attributed to their group's flights, but did point out that the group dispatches flights of between six and 12 drones that appear to fly in "grid patterns."

Spicer said that the group was not aware of the disturbance caused by their drones until the FAA reached out to him. However, he added that none of the drones operated by them were flown close to any airport, and they did not encounter any other civilian aircraft.

Mysterious Sightings

As previously reported, since mid-December, sheriff's departments in the border area of the three states received at least 30 reports of night-time sightings of drone or drone-like objects flying in the sky in formation, sometimes in groups of more than a dozen, as reported by CNET.

Authorities said they believed the mystery drones were being flown over local hospitals and the Sterling Municipal Airport, and a medevac helicopter pilot also reported a near-miss with what he believed was a drone over Fort Morgan, Colorado, less than two weeks ago. The mysterious sightings prompted the FBI, Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the US Air Force to launch an investigation into the sightings.

The FAA also reached out to unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) test sites, drone companies and companies authorised to operate drones in the area, but could not find anyone responsible for the swarms.

The fact that nobody claimed responsibility for the swarms led some to believe that these flying machines are UFOs being controlled by extra-terrestrials and it didn't take long for other conspiracy theories to crop up, including one that mentioned a hunt for a missing nuclear warhead from one of the many intercontinental ballistic missile sites that are located in the three states.