The House of Commons (lower house of British parliament) on Wednesday overturned five amendments to the government's Brexit bill made by the House of Lords (upper house), less than 10 days before Britain is set to exit from the European Union (EU).

The House of Commons rejected all five amendments, covering issues such as child refugees and EU citizens living in Britain, put forward by peers in the House of Lords. Before the bill returned to the Lords, main opposition Labour Party and other political parties, including the Scottish National Party, had urged the government to accept the changes, the Xinhua news agency reported.

Ministers argued that the bill was not the appropriate vehicle for dealing with the issues, as it would reduce Britain's leverage during upcoming negotiations over future relations with the EU.

The House of Lords will later consider the rejection of its amendments. Observers say the solid support in the House of Commons makes the Brexit bill unstoppable.

The bill, which ensures Britain leaves the EU on Jan. 31, will pass between the Houses until both sides agree on the wording. Once the process is finished, it will go to the palace for Royal Assent by Queen Elizabeth II.

Anti-Brexit demonstrators wave EU and Union flags opposite the Houses of Parliament, in London
Anti-Brexit demonstrators wave EU and Union flags opposite the Houses of Parliament, in London Reuters