To fight the cybercrimes in a more efficient way, Singapore Cyber Security Agency (CSA) has decided to create its first academy to bolster the skills of cyber-security professionals that work in government departments and in Singapore's 11 critical sectors, including energy, banking, government, healthcare, and transport, reported The Straits Times.

While speaking about the plan, Teo Chee Hean, the Deputy Prime Minister and Coordinating Minister for National Security, said that the academy is very important, considering the fact that Singapore is one of the most highly connected and tech-savvy countries in the world.

"Singapore is more exposed than many other countries to cyber attack. We are already highly connected, and aim to become more so," he said at the opening event of the second annual Singapore International Cyber Week on Tuesday at the Suntec Convention and Exhibition Centre.

He also said that training is one of the most significant steps towards achieving a more secure and resilient digital community.

However, details about the investment, the academy's launch date and cohort size are still being discussed, as per the publication. However, it has also been reported that CSA will rope in the United States-based cyber-security firm FireEye as its first partner in order to offer training in incident response and malware analysis. The training courses are expected to begin later this year.

FireEye chief executive officer Kevin Mandia said: "FireEye has trained incident responders and malware analysts at some of the most prestigious government agencies and businesses around the world, and we are proud to build the capabilities of Singapore's cyber-security professionals who serve on the front lines and help protect Singapore and its critical information infrastructure from attackers."

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CSA chief executive David Koh said that the Academy was mooted to "plug gaps" in the skills of cyber-security professionals, who handle the IT industrial control systems, like the ones that control the distribution and production of energy and water. "Cyber attacks have become increasingly sophisticated; some of them can be highly complex and targeted," Mr Koh noted.

CSA's this announcement came just after 11 critical sectors of the country was hit by a malicious ransomware and a state-sponsored attack took place on an unnamed government agency last year.

Singapore will also be tabling a Cyber Security Bill next year in Parliament.