British Airways launched an investigation into an anonymous stewardess offering paid in-flight erotic services and even selling her undergarments online. The stewardess posted her racy pictures — apparently taken while on duty — on various social media platforms claiming to be passengers' "in-flight entertainment."

"We expect the highest standard of behavior from all of our colleagues at all times, and we are investigating the claims," a spokesman for the U.K.'s flag carrier airline told the Sun.

AirHostess71

The stewardess identified herself only with her social media name AirHostess71 and told the British tabloid she was a member of the airline's Heathrow-based crew. On her blog, she reportedly said she offered erotic services for passengers in mid-air.

"If you ever want adult entertainment on-board, all you have to do is give me a sum of money and you'll be treated to a whole different experience of your choice," she stated.

British Airways stewardess
Facebook/AirHostess71

The stewardess said she earned extra cash by selling her undergarments online for £25 (US $33) a pair. However, she charged more for one-to-one services.

"You will need to pay a securing fee of £50 to meet. Prices vary depending on the requested meet — no negotiating," AirHostess71 told the Sun. "If I have booked a hotel for work, the meet will take place there (London)."

The stewardess reportedly said she is ready to meet passengers in other countries on one condition. "You would need to book another hotel for protection and privacy," she said.

'Times Are Hard'

One crew member told the Sun that they understood the stewardess' move to offer adult entertainment to passengers due to Covid-related pay cuts.

"This highlights a serious point in that many staff can't afford to live on reduced wages since the cutbacks, and she is raising funds in her own time. But this is not on. Times are hard and if this is something she's happy doing it's hard to argue," the crew member said. "But she is bringing her employer into disrepute and placing herself in great danger."

The coronavirus pandemic hit the hospitality and travel industry hard. In April, British Airways said it would have to let go up to 12,000 employees. The airliner also said that it did not expect flight demand to rise to adequate levels for at least the next five years.