Starbucks tests cashless payment
A view of the new Starbucks Reserve Roastery and Tasting Room during its preview in conjunction with the company's biennial investor meeting in Seattle, Washington December 4, 2014 REUTERS/Jason Redmond

Starbucks announced on Tuesday that it will close all its company-owned stores in the US for the afternoon on May 29 to train employees how to prevent racial discrimination in their stores

In the wake of outrage over the arrest of two African-American men at one of its coffee shops last week, more than 8,000 stores will be closed and training will be provided to nearly 175,000 employees and incorporated into company training going forward, according to Starbucks.

The curriculum will be designed "to address implicit bias, promote conscious inclusion, prevent discrimination and ensure everyone inside a Starbucks store feels safe and welcome," Xinhua quoted Starbucks as saying in a statement.

The move came after the Seattle-based chain was under fire for a decision by staff at one of its Philadelphia stores to call the police on two African-American men when they did not buy anything and asked to use the restrooms.

The two men were told they could not use the restrooms unless they are paying customers. They explained that they were waiting for a friend, who later arrived.

Police arrested them and the footage of which has been viewed millions of times and drawn widespread condemnation.

The company's CEO Kevin Johnson has apologised for the incident and the coffee giant confirmed that the Philadelphia employee who called the police is no longer with the company.

"While this is not limited to Starbucks, we're committed to being a part of the solution," Johnson said. "Closing our stores for racial bias training is just one step in a journey that requires dedication from every level of our company and partnerships in our local communities."