Music lens
Screenshot of new Music lens Echo Music

Music software firm Echo Music is crossing the hardware threshold with its novel wearable technology sunglasses that play music and radio without being shut off from the real-world completely. Presented at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) 2018 in Las Vegas, the sunglasses also enable users to perform voice calls.

The MusicLens sunglasses and prescription spectacles use IP6 waterproof bone-conduction technology to allow wearers tune in to music and listen to the radio with the help of a smartphone app. Primarily, Echo Music aims to deliver a wireless and exclusive sound experience without being cut off from one's surrounding.

Also read: First Alexa-powered AR glasses is worth $1000: Is it worth buying?

Leveraging the bone conduction technology, this audio wearable device works by channelling sound waves to the skull through vibrations--no wires, no peripherals.

"MusicLens range boasts a premium sound-leak reduction system to stop the outside world from hearing the music," describes Echo Show in a statement.

MusicLens' battery life can last up to 12 hours, ideal for travelling, exercising, shopping, driving and just about anything. Users are capable of adjusting the level of darkness in the glasses to suit the light levels available around.

Also read: Leaving home? You need Kevin speaker to ward off burglars

Users only need the Echo Music app, which can be downloaded from the App Store and Play Store, to stream music or radio. The sunglasses also allow users to call people right into the app.

"We have brought together the very best bone conduction technology, audio playback and radio in order to deliver the premium Echo Music MusicLens range of wearable products," says JunYi Liu, chief executive at Echo Music.

"These wearable devices give us a glimpse of the future, where helpful technology will augment many everyday items to provide a better life experience."

Different styles of the MusicLens sunglasses are currently available from US$88 to US$199.