painkillers
Representational image of painkillers (Pixabay) Pixabay

Scott Purdy, a 23-year-old man from the United Kingdom has claimed that painkillers have turned him a gay. He revealed that after taking the painkillers, he lost his attraction towards women, and developed a sexual attraction to men. Purdy claimed that he even broke with his girlfriend six months ago due to his gay sexual fantasies.

"I noticed my libido for women had gone and I was wanting male attention. I was with a girlfriend I had been with for around six months. I had never been interested in men. When I was younger I was a little bit curious but a couple of weeks after I started taking it. I turned around and said I didn't find her physically attractive anymore. She knew I was taking Pregabalin," said Scott Purdy, Metro UK reports.

Pregabalin, marketed under the brand name Lyrica by pharmaceutical giant Pfizer is being widely prescribed all over the world to treat epilepsy and anxiety disorders. According to experts, the most noted side effects of this medication are loss of libido and extreme mood swings.

Scott Purdy also revealed that once he stopped taking Pregabalin, his attraction towards men went off.

"I just think people should know about this. If anyone gets prescribed this in the future, I think they should know what this medication can do. It took me a while to realize what it was. I stopped taking it for a few weeks and that desire for men just left. But I'm on it now; I'm very happy. I want to keep on taking it because it makes me feel happy about my sexuality. It's made me feel very open. It's liberating," continued Scott.

In the initial days of treatment, Scott was prescribed Codeine by his physician. But when he started developing negative effects due to the medication, the doctor prescribed the Pregabalin.

As the news went viral, a spokesman for Pfizer revealed that their company's utmost priority is patient's safety. The spokesperson also requested people to seek medical advice if they face negative effects due to the medication.