Viagra
Pixabay

American pharmaceutical giant, Pfizer has been manufacturing their iconic erectile dysfunction drug Viagra in Ringaskiddy, Co. Cork, Ireland for the last two decades. Now villagers in this tiny Irish village have claimed that there is something in the air which is creating an arousing effect on men living there and even dogs.

Magic fumes on Irish skies

A recent report published in the Sunday Times states that villagers have started talking about the magical powers of the fumes from the Viagra factory.

Barmaid Debbie O'Grady, a local resident living in Rigaskiddy told Sunday Times that these fumes are capable of giving and sustaining an erection and the whole village is respiring these love fumes, for free, over many years.

Fiona Toomey, a psychiatric nurse who recently returned to the village after spending five years in the US said that she witnessed dogs madly running due to an intense sexual excitement. She also added that Viagra might have got mixed with the water supply in the village.

Pfizer's comment on the issue

As a response to these weird claims, Pfizer responded that a 'whiff creates stiff' is nothing but an amusing myth. The Company also made it clear that their manufacturing process is very much regulated and sophisticated. Its waste disposal is based on applying green chemistry principles in research, development and manufacturing processes.

However, an in-depth study of Viagra's wastage procedure by Pfizer shows that any leakage of powdered drug may also cause side-effects. The official website lists Viagra usage with precautions for Safe Handling minimizing dust generation and accumulation as below:

"If tablets or capsules are crushed and/or broken, avoid breathing dust and avoid contact with eyes, skin, and clothing.

When handling, use appropriate personal protective equipment.

Wash thoroughly after handling.

Releases to the environment should be avoided.

Review and implement appropriate technical and procedural waste water and waste disposal measures to prevent occupational exposure or environmental releases.

Potential points of process emissions of this material to the atmosphere should be controlled with dust collectors, HEPA filtration systems or other equivalent controls."