AI
A robot gestures during a demonstration of its skill during the seventh Soccer World Championship for Robots in Padua, northern Italy, July 9, 2003. Robocup is an international research and education initiative aimed at fostering artificial intelligence and robotics research. Reuters

Gory footage compiled by AI experts, features small drones descending on a classroom and killing pupils without being commanded to do so, will be shown in the United Nations on November 14, to enlighten the world representatives on possible human destruction by robots.

The objective of showing this film is to promote awareness regarding the danger of using autonomous weapons that can cause gruesome destruction without instruction.

This move comes in the wake of AI weapon advancement deployed by nations at war.

AI scientist Stuart Russell will be presenting the film today at the UN Nations Convention on Conventional Weapons, which is being hosted by Campaign to Stop Killer Robots. According to Russell, this weapon can be created and is not merely a science fiction. Surprisingly, the scientist claims that it can be easily achieved than making self-driving cars.

"The technology illustrated in the film is simply an integration of existing capabilities. It is not science fiction. In fact, it is easier to achieve than self-driving cars, which require far higher standards of performance," Russell told The Guardian.

There lies a huge possibility that robots that can make their own decision before killing, on its whims might be created in near future. As believed by the scientist, autonomous weapons can be a huge threat to the society and might end up destructing the whole world.

Russell further states that producing lethal autonomous weapons will reduce international, national, local and personal security. Also, it might pose a danger to the whole world if the weapon is developed by any rogue nation or terrorist outfit.