In the wake of recent terror attacks at London Bridge in the UK, Apple has just revealed that their technology is doing the same to help the UK government. In an interview with Bloomberg, Tim Cook, CEO of Apple confirmed that the company is "cooperating with the UK government" to keep a check on terrorism and hopefully stop it.

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Tim Cook, CEO, Apple Reuters

Although Cook said that no details about the cooperation could be revealed, he did say that the government of the US is being facilitated, through a "lawful process", with the data stored on the company's servers that could help track down the suspects of terror attacks, which have been plaguing the country for quite some time now.

UK has been a victim of the growing terror attacks in Europe, which has also targeted France and other countries. In the last three months, there have been three attacks that have led the government to take stringent steps in order to curb the violent extremism, which is being hailed to be the reason behind the attacks. The government has recently arrested several people, who are suspected to have been involved in the recent attacks including a suicide bombing that killed 22 people in Manchester Arena in May.

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Floral tributes are seen near the scene of the recent attack at London Bridge and Borough Market in central London, Britain Reuters

Technology companies have been criticized for not co-operating with the tracking process by some critics, who have also called for the removal of certain encryption standards, which might aid in identifying terrorists. Apple responded to the issue via Cook, who said that while the company is going to aid the government by facilitating information that can help law enforcements to track and find terrorists, they won't be compromising with the encryption standards.

Cook's interview with Bloomberg was focused on discussing affairs related to politics and government, where the topic of Donald Trump's decision of removing U.S. out of the Paris climate accord was also discussed. While Cook was critical of the decision and thought it to be "not in the best interest of the United States", he confirmed that he will remain an advisor to the president.